Aikido Classes at Harbison Recreation Center

 Aikido is a Japanese martial art using wrist and arm locks, pins and throws, rather than punches and kicks. 


Aikido Classes at Harbison Recreation Center

 Aikido is a Japanese martial art using wrist and arm locks, pins and throws, rather than punches and kicks. 


About Us

What is Aikido?

  Aikido is the Japanese martial art of self-defense by throws, locks of the arms and wrists, and pins. Aikido means "the way of spiritual harmony". There are no punching or kicking techniques in Aikido.

Aikido was developed by Morihei Uyeshiba (1883-1965), who had studied several forms of religion, fencing, and jiu-jitsu. In 1924, he had an "enlightenment" after an altercation with a Japanese naval officer, in which the officer repeatedly tried to strike him with a wooden sword. Uyeshiba simply evaded the attacks, without counter-action against the officer.

Immediately afterwards, he said "I was enlightened - the source of budo is God's love - the loving protection of all beings".

Thereafter, to teach his concept of "harmony", he developed Aikido by softening the original military jitsu techniques that were designed to kill or injure. In Aikido, the physical goals are to either throw the person down or pin the person to the ground by an arm-lock. Aikido is not a religion, but it does maintain the high ethical standards of religion.

Although Aikido is considered to be a soft form of jiu-jitsu, the techniques are powerful and effective. Aikido locks can be uncomfortable, but they are not injurious to the joints. Throws to the ground can be hard or soft, depending on the severity of the attack.


Although Aikido is designed to control and not injure an attacker, it can be used against multiple lethal attackers to severely damage wrist and arm joints with the locks and severely damage body parts contacting the ground from the throws. Conversely, single non-lethal attackers can be controlled without injuring them.


Aikido is suitable for people who do not like punching and kicking people. Conversely, for people who already do the punching and kicking arts, selected Aikido techniques can be very effectively utilized to follow up with a wrist lock and pin or throw.

Aikido utilizes the following principles, among others:

 1. Relaxation of body and mind
 2. Centering of body and mind at the "one-point" just below the belt
 3. Practicing the concept of "no-thought" during techniques
 4. Extension of "ki" or energy of body and mind
 5. Blending the "ki" of the Aikidoist with the "ki" of the opponent
 6. Techniques of Japanese sword and stick movements
 7. Non-resistance to force
 8. Utilization of leverage, timing, body weight, body power, circular movements, and centrifugal force

Aikido is a way of life, not just a martial art. Outside the school, one becomes more relaxed and self-confident. Aikido trains a person to relax under stress. Through Aikido training, a person can better deal with other people both intellectually and physically. re.

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instructor

 Sensei Lamar Sanders is 5th Dan, and studied Aikido in Atlanta, Georgia from 1972 to 1979 with Sensei Rodney Grantham, who was one of the first to teach Aikido in the Southeast. Sensei Sanders studied Aikido in Washington, DC from 1979 to 1984 under Sensei Clyde Takeguchi and Sensei Gordon Sakemoto. Since 1984, he has taught Aikido at the Harbison Recreation Center in Columbia, South Carolina.

Sensei Sanders and the school are members of the United States Aikido Federation (USAF) , founded by Sensei Yoshimitsu Yamada from Japan. The USAF is one of the first Aikido organizations established in the United States. It is affiliated with the Founder Morihei Uyeshiba's school in Japan, which issues all black belt certificates for the USAF.

Other than applying Aikido to American-style attacks and making modifications for use in law enforcement, Sensei Sanders teaches the traditional Aikido techniques developed by Morihei Uyeshiba.

Sensei Sanders and members of the Columbia Police Department and Lexington County Sheriff's department have developed effective Aikido techniques for law enforcement. In particular, the Aikido Sankyo wrist lock implemented for searching and handcuffing prevents escalation to any kind of violent reaction.

The Sensei has a degree in civil engineering from Georgia Tech. He was a hydrologist for the U. S. Geological Survey for 43 years before retiring in 2003. He was a hydraulic engineer with the South Carolina Department of Transportation before retiring in 2009.   

Weekly Classes

Tuesdays and Thursdays

Aikido classes for both beginners and advanced students.

7:30 pm - 8:45 pm

Harbison Recreation Center, 106 Hillpine Road, Columbia, SC

Tuesdays and Thursdays

Aikido classes for both beginners and advanced students.

7:30 pm - 8:45 pm

Harbison Recreation Center, 106 Hillpine Road, Columbia, SC

Tuition


Contact Us

If you have questions about the opportunities available to you in our program, please call Lamar Sanders  any time at 803-319-9848.

Harbison Recreation Center

106 Hillpine Road, Columbia, South Carolina 29212, United States

(803) 319-9848

Hours

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 7:30-8:45 pm